60 Results for: News Stories

CITES can – and should – improve its remedial process for countries that tolerate unsustainable trade

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) needs to improve how it deals with member countries that do not meet their commitment to sustainable trade, according to a study from the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries (IOF). On paper, CITES has teeth. Unlike many other big, international … Read more CITES can – and should – improve its remedial process for countries that tolerate unsustainable trade

Amanda Vincent shares how saving seahorses saves our seas…

As a new Fellow to the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) Dr. Amanda Vincent shared her love of seahorses, and how they anchor her trailblazing work in ocean conservation during the RSC Cafe Presentations in November 2020. New Fellows are invited to tell non-specialists about their work and why it is important. Earlier in 2020, … Read more Amanda Vincent shares how saving seahorses saves our seas…

Hedgehog seahorses susceptible to bottom trawling

This lovely sea creature is a Hedgehog seahorse (Hippocampus spinosissimus) – it was photographed off the coast of the northern Philippines by iNaturalist user Francesco Ricciardi. The Hedgehog seahorse is frequently found on corals and sea sponges, as well as the sandy bottoms of the ocean where they  feed on small crustaceans and other planktonic … Read more Hedgehog seahorses susceptible to bottom trawling

Awards in the time of Covid

Winning an individual award is an exciting yet awkward experience for me. Exciting because it’s lovely to be acknowledged for hard work, persistence and insights. Awkward because I am hugely conscious that the recognition directed at me should embrace the entire Project Seahorse team of wonderful people, along with a large number of other contributors. … Read more Awards in the time of Covid

We inspired the whole conservation world to agree on some really important actions

I am truly thrilled that more than 1400 conservation agencies and organizations have just adopted new policies that had their genesis with our Project Seahorse team. This huge alliance is really going to move us forward – on fisheries, bycatch, ecosystem restoration and on conserving seahorses and their relatives. It’s a bit tricky to explain … Read more We inspired the whole conservation world to agree on some really important actions

China’s policy efforts to limit bottom trawling are not working

by Riley Tjosvold (Cross-posted from UBC Oceans) A recently published paper by researchers at Project Seahorse, Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries (IOF) tracked the changes in China’s bottom trawl fishing policies from the 1950s to today. By analyzing policy changes over time, the researchers were able to highlight the difficulties of managing the bottom … Read more China’s policy efforts to limit bottom trawling are not working

Talking syngnathids – (early) morning, noon and (late) night

2020 has been a strange year, to say the least, not exactly what we were hoping for, but here it is. There was so much to look forward to and many of our plans have been disrupted, like everyone else around the world. Our colleagues at the Chinese Academy of Sciences were working so incredibly … Read more Talking syngnathids – (early) morning, noon and (late) night

Protecting Giraffes – Giraffe seahorses that is – in Mozambique

This proud Giraffe seahorse (Hippocampus camelopardalis) was observed in Mozambique by Dr. Louw Claassens (IUCN Seahorse, Pipefish and Seadragon Specialist Group Member), who then posted it to iSeahorse, our citizen science initiative. While not much is known about Giraffe seahorses – they are classified as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List – we do … Read more Protecting Giraffes – Giraffe seahorses that is – in Mozambique

Flirtatious Shorthead seahorses

Our latest featured iSeahorse observation is this beautiful Shorthead seahorse (Hippocampus breviceps) by iNaturalist user ken_flan. It is also known as the Knobby seahorse and lives in southwestern and southeastern coastal Australia. It’s clear where this seahorse gets its common names as it is characterized by a short snout and fleshy tendrils on its head … Read more Flirtatious Shorthead seahorses