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Flirtatious Shorthead seahorses

Our latest featured iSeahorse observation is this beautiful Shorthead seahorse (Hippocampus breviceps) by iNaturalist user ken_flan. It is also known as the Knobby seahorse and lives in southwestern and southeastern coastal Australia. It’s clear where this seahorse gets its common names as it is characterized by a short snout and fleshy tendrils on its head …

White’s seahorse: one of two Endangered seahorse species

We took a little break from posting featured iSeahorse observations, but we are back at it again! To kick things off we are featuring this gorgeous White’s seahorse (Hippocampus whitei) photographed by user Peter “fiftygrit” in New South Wales, Australia.  White’s seahorse was recently listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List, one of two …

Amanda Vincent – Savior of Seahorses – 2020 Indianapolis Prize Finalist

Prof. Amanda Vincent became the first biologist to study seahorses underwater in 1986. Ever since, she has been the leading authority on the ecology and conservation of seahorses and a protector of marine life. In 1996, Amanda co-founded and still directs Project Seahorse, an international organization committed to conservation and sustainable use of the world’s …

Small and mighty (Why the weedy pygmy is going strong)

Our latest iSeahorse featured observation comes from Daniel Schofield (djscho on iNaturalist) who captured this wonderful weedy pygmy (Hippocampus pontohi) amidst the pink corals of Indonesia. The weedy pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus pontohi) was named after the Indonesian dive guide, Hence Pontoh, who discovered it. As with most pygmy seahorses, it grows to ~ 1.5 centimeters …

The “amazing race” to uncover seahorse trade and exploitation in the Philippines

We recently set out on an amazing race, criss-crossing the Philippines by plane, boat, bus and car in less than 3 months, to uncover seahorse trade and exploitation. We discovered that 1.7+ million seahorses are caught per year in the Philippines, compared to over 4 million per year 20 years ago. Despite international trade (CITES) …

A new chapter for me, and my future in conservation

In this introductory blog Adam Hicks, our new Masters student gives us some background on himself, and what he hopes to at Project Seahorse. Who am I ? In the last two years I have travelled, trekked and transformed my life. I never expected I would leave my job as an Ecologist in the United …