38 Results for: Trade

Project Seahorse work leads to huge international change, as Thailand announces it is suspending seahorse exports

Story originally posted on UBC’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries Project Seahorse, a marine conservation research unit based at The University of British Columbia’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, is applauding Thailand’s decision to end seahorse exports until it can trade in a sustainable manner, without damaging their wild populations. We spoke to …

On being part of the world’s largest conservation team

By Dr. Amanda Vincent It is truly wondrous that the world has managed to create a global action group for conservation, one that includes 1200 governments and non-governmental organizations. I am so involved in this club, called the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) that I seldom step back and really look at …

Three more countries required to take action for seahorses

By Dr. Amanda Vincent Good. Two more seahorses species should get better help, thanks to the recent CITES technical meeting for animals. At this meeting, CITES expressed Urgent Concern about Guinea and Senegal’s exports of West African seahorses (Hippocampus algiricus – photo right) and Thailand’s exports of three spotted seahorses (Hippocampus trimaculatus). The upshot is that these countries have …

Supporting seahorses through CITES – here we go again…

Here we go: CITES again. Every year or so, several hundred people sit down at a technical meeting to see whether international trade controls are doing any good for animals. It’s a somewhat crazy process, full of potential and limitations. CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, is responsible for ensuring sustainability in exports in 4827 animal species. It works more or less well for different countries and different species.… Read more

CITES, conservation, and geopolitics

By Dr. Amanda Vincent There it is.  I have survived another week of UN negotiations on wildlife trade.  And emerged content. I’ve been in Geneva to contribute to the technical working group on animals for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, or CITES.  It meets to execute the will of …

NOTES FROM IMCC 2011: Some thoughts on CITES

By Dr. Amanda Vincent So, how can we ensure that the commercial trade of marine life doesn’t damage wild populations? I am writing this while sitting in a discussion group with a bunch of other scientists, most of whom who have spent years working with CITES, a UN convention that controls exports of species that are …